ATP World Team Cup Betting Offers 2020

atp team world cupTennis is not know as a team game but it will now have two nations World Cup events in the space of six weeks from 2020.

The ATP Cup is not new and was contested from 1975 to 2012.  The re-vamped tournament however is designed to be a much more prestigious tournament.  The leading 24 nations (based on ranking of each nations number one ATP player) will compete in a round-robin group stage followed by a knockout at the start of January over ten days prior to the Australian Open.

The new event comes with a fair amount of controversy.  The re-vamped Davis Cup will be played at the end of the 2019 season in late November and following a short end of season break the top nations in the world will be back to contest the ATP World Team Cup.

Many think this is simply too much tennis and may kill the Goose that laid the golden egg.  Others think it will produce new opportunities for players to earn money ($15M prize fund) and ATP ranking points.  It will also ensure the season starts with a global event of significance that could aid the grand slam event that follows as leading players will be in more competitive shape.

The ATP World Team Cup will be held in Australia to minimise disruption and is due to take place across three cities. As usual there will be a lot of interest from punters and bookies, especially for the inaugural event.  If you are going to place a bet make sure you get added value by taking a promotions listed below.  Also on this page you can find information about the ATP Cup format, stats, history and more.

ATP World Cup Betting Odds and Promotions

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ATP Team World Cup Schedule 2020

Date Round Format
3-9th January Group 2x Singles + 1x Doubles
10th January Quarter-Finals 2x Singles + 1x Doubles
11th January Semi-Finals 2x Singles + 1x Doubles
12th January Final 2x Singles + 1x Doubles

The New ATP Team World Cup is due to take place over the first and second week of January 2020.  The precise dates and format are yet to be released and we will update this section as soon as they are.

How The ATP Team World Cup Works

tennis player celebratingEven those with only a passing interest in tennis as a sport will have heard of the Majors like Wimbledon and the US Open. For those that watch the game more intently, there has been something of a clamour for them to become more interesting and exciting in recent years, with the overwhelming feeling being that the sport would benefit hugely from a shakeup.

That initially came courtesy of the International Tennis Federation’s announcement that they were going to revamp the Davis Cup from 2019 onwards, which in turn resulted in confirmation from the Association of Tennis Professionals that they would be relaunching the World Team Cup.

Sufficed to say, then, that tennis fans have got the re-jig of the sport that they were hoping for. In many ways, of course, they’re right in suggesting that it’s exactly what the sport needs; the classic tournaments will remain largely untouched whilst the less beloved ones will receive a shake-up that will garner them some much needed attention.

Much as with the ATP World Tour Finals, the World Team Cup is an event for men only, with female tennis players coming under the jurisdiction of the Women’s Tennis Association. Here we’ll tell you some information about the history of the World Team Cup as well what the new version of the tournament involves.

New 2020 Format

tennis player silhouettes of various play positions

Twenty four nations will be split up into six groups of four teams.  It will be held at the start of January 2020 over 10 days preceding the Australian Open.

Groups play each other in a round-robin format, meaning each nation will play three group matches.  Being an ATP event this is of course a men only competition.

Following this the winner and runner-up from each group will qualify for the knockout stage.  Eight teams will progress to the quarter finals, followed by the semi-finals and the final.  Like the Davis Cup this will be on consecutive days in quite a tight schedule.

Five players will be selected for each team and each nation will play two singles matches and a doubles match in each tie.

750 ATP ranking points will also be available for the event alongside a $15M prize pool, to incentivise players to start their season even earlier to compete in this event.

Qualification

tennis ballThe 24 nations will be selected based on the ATP ranking of the number one singles player from each country.  You can therefore guarantee the likes of Spain, Switzerland, Serbia, Argentina, Germany, France and Italy will all be involved.

It is unknown whether hosts Australia will receive a wild card entry should they struggle to get a player into the top 24 ATP ranking spots.

The chances of the UK qualifying are strong should Kyle Edmund retain his current ranking and if Andy Murray can come back strong in 2019 this should increase those chanced further.

Australia To Host 2020 ATP World Cup

Awarding the re-vamped ATP World Team Cup to Australia was a strategic move as much as anything.  Knowing the controversy caused by launching the competition in an already packed landscape of tennis tournaments the organising body knew they had to reduce travel and disruption for players to take part.

The 2020 ATP Cup will therefore take place in Australia finishing less than a week before the start of the Australian Open.  While this will help players acclimatise it still means competitors will be starting their season earlier with less preparation time.  The follows the 2019 season with the latest finish yet due to the re-vamped end of season Davis Cup.

On the other hand many say this event could improve the Australian Open itself in light of the fact players will be more ready for the event following a competitive ATP Cup.

2020 ATP Cup Venues

atp world team cup queenland tennis centre potential venue

Again right now it is unknown exactly where World Cup matches will take place.  Given the event is so close to the Aussie Open it is unlikely Melbourne will be used as it will be preparing for the Grand Slam tournament.

Brisbane is the front runner to host all or part of the event and is cited as being among three cities in contention.  If selected the Queensland Tennis Centre (pictured above) will be the likely venue, regularly delivering 90,000+ attendances during the Brisbane International.

Perth and Adelaide have also all declared an early interest in hosting the new tournament.  It is again unknown whether the entire competition will take place in one city or whether it will be held across the country.

Should the event be contested country wide it is highly likely Sydney will be used for the final itself.  Again once announced we will update you here on the venues that will be used.

Prize Money

Stage Of Tournament Players Prize Money Federation Prize Money
Winner $? $?
Finalist $? $?
Semi-Finalist $? $?
Quarter-Finalist $? $?
Group Stages $? $?

$15,000,000 (~£11.35M) in prize money has been announced for the 2020 event.  This is an almost 1000% increase from the prize money at the last world team event in 2012.

The exact breakdown of prize money is yet unknown but it is likely the winner will recieve in the region of $2.5M, putting the event in a similar league to the grand slams.

It is also unknown at present how much money nations may receive.  As soon as this information is made available we will lsit those figures here.

History and Origins Of The ATP Team World Cup

atp world team cup logo on a tennis net

Founded under the moniker of the Nations Cup, the competition took place for the first time in Kingston, Jamaica back in 1975. Whilst it was hardly a failure, it wasn’t quite successful enough to mean there was much of a clamour for the event to happen again in 1976 nor in 1977. That all changed the following year, however, when it was moved to Düsseldorf in Germany. That became the tournament’s home until it was disbanded in 2012.

It was known as the Solaire Nations Cup from 1978 until 1981, becoming the Ambre Solaire World Team Cup for the four years that followed. Ambre Solaire’s partnership with it ended in 1987 when it became the Peugeot World Team Cup for the twelve years that followed.

The turn of the millennium saw another new sponsor in the form the ARAG Insurance Group, resulting in a new name for it of the AWAG World Team Cup. ARAG Stopped sponsoring it in 2010 and it looked as if there would be no tournament in 2011 until Power Horse came along at the last moment.

When the competition was abandoned in 2012 it was replaced by an ATP 250 tournament known as the Power Horse Cup, which continued to be played on clay in Düsseldorf.

Format Of The Original Competition

atp world team cup winners 2012

Each year, eight nations were invited to take part in the tournament. The qualifying criteria was that the countries that sent teams to compete in the competition were those that had the best combined placing in the world ranking’s list for men for their top two players.

The World Team Cup took place on clay courts and saw the eight participating teams take part in a round-robin tournament. The were whittled down to the final two representing teams, which would go up against each another in a head-to-head final.

ATP World Cup Winners

Country Titles 1975 – 2012# (Runners-Up) Titles Since 2020* Last Won
Germany 5 (3) 2011
United States 5 (4) 1993
Argentina 4 (3) 2010
Sweden 4 (2) 2008
Spain 4 (1) 1997
Australia 3 (6) 2001
Czechoslovakia 2 (0) 1987
Chile 2 (0) 2004
Serbia 2 (0) 2012
Yugoslavia 1 (1) 1990
Croatia 1 (1) 2006
France 1 (0) 2018
Switzerland 1 (0) 1986
Slovakia 1 (0) 2000

# Not held in 1976 or 1977

*  The ATP World Team Cup did not run between 2012-2020 and now has a new format and so winners will be counted separately

The first winning nation was the United States, who also became the first nation to defend their crown when they won back-to-back titles in 1984 and 1985.

The US and Germany shared the most wins, being victorious five times apiece. There’s an argument that the United States were the most successful, though, thanks to their four runners-up spots compared to Germany’s three.

Argentina, Sweden and Spain each won the World Team Cup three times, whilst the Czech Republic, Russia, Italy and Great Britain all made the final at least once but never won it. Of the four, the Czech Republic were the most ‘unlucky’, playing in six finals but never winning. That included the last outing of this version of the event in 2012 when they lost to Serbia.

Creation Of The New ATP World Team Cup

atp finals tennisIn July of 2018 the Association of Tennis Professionals announced plans to re-launch the World Team Cup. It was done so in partnership with Tennis Australia, with the first version of the competition due to take place in Australia in 2020.

The Executive Chairman and President of the ATP, Chris Kermode, said that it would ‘change the landscape’ of the ATP’s World Tour event, kicking off the 2020 season with a team event that would have little to no impact on the schedule that was already in place for players.

The aim of the new version of the tournament was to deliver something sustainable in the long-term, both for the heath of the participating players and in financial terms.

Unlike the original version of the competition, which was open to the best eight countries, the new-look World Team Cup will see twenty-four teams competing for $15 million in prize money, plus ATP Ranking points.

Roger Federer said that he hoped that the World Tennis Cup would do for his sport what the World Cup did for football, becoming an event that takes over people’s mindsets for the month of its duration.

He acknowledged that it could take years for that to be the case, adding that he hoped the ITF and ATP could work together, given that the World Team Cup is the main rival tournament to the Davis Cup.

Davis Cup and Other Competitions

davis cup player hits a shot

It’s slightly disingenuous to suggest that there was a need for a World Team Cup in tennis. The sport already boasts several such competitions in different disciplines, as follows:

  • The Davis Cup – This is the tournament’s biggest rival competition, organised by the International Tennis Federation and revamped in 2018 ahead of the 2019 season
  • The Fed Cup – The women’s version of the Davis Cup was launched in 1963
  • The Hopman Cup – Created in 1989, the Hopman Cup ticks a box for fans of mixed doubles that like to watch team tennis events
  • The Laver Cup – Designed to be tennis’ version of golf’s Ryder Cup, this even was founded in 2017 and sees Team Europe take on Team World
  • Olympic Tennis – Only held every four years but carries a status for tennis players akin to winning a major.  This may be an individual event but players are competing for their country nonetheless. It’s hard to see how all these tournaments could be played in an Olympic year.

A Potential Rift In Tennis

davis cup tennis match

One of the concerns of tennis fans comes in the form of the potential rift between the Association of Tennis Professionals and the International Tennis Federation.

The revamping of the Davis Cup, taking it away from the home and away format that has been its bread and butter for years, and moving it towards a format similar to the World Team Cup means that there will be two such events taking place just months apart.

Top tennis players already feel as though too many demands are being made on their time, so it’s possible that the launching of two not dissimilar events in quick succession might well see those at the top of the game begin to turn against each other, depending on where their loyalties lie.

The plan for the ATP’s tournament is for it to take place in January 2020, whilst the ITF’s Davis Cup is due to be contested by eighteen nations between the 18th and 28th of November 2019.

Given that 2020 is already due to have players taking part in the Tokyo Olympics, the Laver Cup and all of the usual tournaments, it’s unlikely to please the big names that they’ll be so busy at the end of the preceding year.